About Me

Entered April 2, 2019:

Many of you have been wondering what has been going on with me for the past several months. I have not really shared much of this with my FB friends and family, but some of you saw bits and pieces of this while I was in the hospital at the end of November and beginning of December in 2018. Some of you may have more questions about my health. I will try to catch you up to the best of my ability.

About the end of February or beginning of March of 2018, I was diagnosed with NASH. Usually, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) are silent diseases with few or no symptoms. You may not have symptoms even if you develop cirrhosis due to NASH.

Well, long story short, I had a couple of Esophageal varices which are enlarged veins in the lower esophagus. They’re often due to obstructed blood flow through the portal vein, which carries blood from the intestine and spleen to the liver. I had one about nine months ago and it was only about 1-2 inches long. Well, it multiplied, and they have grown into the midway part of my esophagus and I have over 10 now. On November 29th, 2018, six of them ruptured and I lost a lot of blood. My hemoglobin was 5.7. A man my size should have a hemoglobin of 14-16. The doctor said had I not gone to the ER when I did and just gone to sleep, I would not have woken up the next morning. On Monday, January 7th, 2019, I went in to have four more varices banded. I won’t have to go back for another year unless something happens between now and then.

Jerry and I will be headed to Dallas on January 20, 2019, for me to meet the transplant team. I will be tested the 21st – 23rd to see if I am a candidate for a transplant. If I am, I will be placed on the liver transplant list and wait for a transplant. During this time, I have 28 appointments with the team. Please be praying for me to endure through the appointments, and for Jerry, as he provides me with care and support during this time. He has really been a Godsend for me. I don’t know what I would do if I didn’t have him walking beside me through this.

Jerry and I will be headed to Dallas on January 20, 2019, for me to meet the transplant team. I will be tested the 21st – 23rd to see if I am a candidate for a transplant. If I am, I will be placed on the liver transplant list and wait for a transplant. During this time, I have 28 appointments with the team. Please be praying for me to endure through the appointments, and for Jerry, as he provides me with care and support during this time. He has really been a Godsend for me. I don’t know what I would do if I didn’t have him walking beside me through this.

We got back from Dallas. The Evaluation Team told me I was too healthy to be put on the transplant list at this time. They go by a meld score. A MELD score is a number that ranges from 6 to 40, based on lab tests. It ranks your degree of sickness, which shows how much you need a liver transplant. The Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD) is a numerical scale, ranging. from 6 (less ill) to 40 (gravely ill), used for liver transplant candidates age 12. and older. It gives each person a ‘score‘ (number) based on how urgently he. or she needs a liver transplant within the next three months. There are four stages of cirrhosis of the liver. Stage 1: mild fibrosis without walls of scarring. Stage 2: mild to moderate fibrosis with walls of scarring. Stage 3: bridging fibrosis or scarring that has spread to different parts of the liver but no cirrhosis. Stage 4: severe scarring, or cirrhosis. Dyingofliverfailure is generally pain free. … Pain perception and judgement are reduced, and the patients are generally unaware. In early liverfailure, there is increased drowsiness and sedation. As the liverfailure progresses, the patient becomes sleepier and then eventually slips into a coma.

Dr. Mantry told us I would probably go through the bleeding process about every 6-8 weeks. Well, I ended up going to get four more of the varices banded in Dr. Duvall’s office, inpatient, on February 8. Well, on March 8th, I went back into the hospital. This time I was bleeding from a capillary that had to be injected with epinephrine and then clipped to stop the bleeding.

Needless to say, I have been going to the hospital more than every 6-8 weeks. Because of this, Dr. Mantry told us to come to Dallas for a consultation regarding a TIPS procedure. We decided to move forward with this procedure. I have to go through some bloodwork, an Esophagogastroduodenostomy (that is where they go down my throat again), US ABDOMEN COMPLETE with HPP US 4, and a US DUPLEX HEPATIC DOPPLER with HPP US 4. These are similar to sonograms but not really. Once I complete these tests and everything looks good, we will discuss when to do the TIPS procedure. I don’t know if it will be done in Dallas or in Tyler at this time.

Well, that is what we know right now.